The Right Kind of Wrong by P.J. Trebelhorn

A lot of times if the romance genre we see a lot of the same plot devices recycled. You’ve read the I’m in love with my best friend but won’t/can’t tell her many, many times. When done really well this plot tends to deliver a lot of glorious angst, which I am a huge fan of. The Right Kind of Wrong
by P.J. Trebelhorn fall somewhere in the middle. Not a fantastic book, but not terrible either.

Quinn Burke is a forty something bartender who runs through college co-eds like water. Having had her heart-broke not that long ago, Quinn has turned to one night stands to keep things emotionally easy. The only problem with that is she has long harbored romantic feelings for her bestie for about twenty years.

Grace Everett, a small bookstore owner adores Quinn. When Quinn asked her out years ago she told her she needed a friend more than a lover. Over the years, it always seemed as they were never single at the same time. So when attraction popped up, she would squash it down because their friendship is so precious. When Quinn’s mom has a heart attack, that becomes the catalyst for Grace to finally admit to Quinn her feelings.

So much missed communication ensues, so much repressed emotion, and what was surprising to me is normally I like all of that. This story, however was lacking, I struggled to keep going. Its not overly complicated, its just kind of flat. The angst is there but didn’t really move me. All the side character drama felt like filler and didn’t help the story at all, it was more distracting than anything. Towards the end you feel like your reading the same chapters over and over, characters having the same conversations yet again. By the end I was glad to see the two mains get together so I could move on.

2.75 stars out of 5

To Purchase: Desperate Measures

29502432

 

Advertisements